OVEREXPOSED: Maroon 5 Album Review

So I’m kind of late to this party. This album came out in late June of this year. The thing is, I’m not a huge Maroon 5 fan. I mean, the last full album of theirs that I bought was “Songs About Jane.” That’s right. A 10-year-old album. I bought it in middle school. Since then I’ve bought some singles (Misery, Won’t Go Home Without You, Makes Me Wonder), but I never really had the desire to purchase one of their full albums.

However, I had only heard good things about “Overexposed” so I decided to give it a shot, and what a worthwhile shot it was.

Maroon 5 is definitely more…I want to say “mainstream,” but I feel like that sounds way too hipster. The songs on this album sound more oriented for radio, if that makes sense. It’s kind of a party album ya know? They’re more of a pop-rock band on this one. Like P!nk. Most of the songs on this album sound like P!nk songs (with the occasional rapper featuring) and that’s not a bad thing at all! I love P!nk! Maroon 5’s songs definitely have some darker, more sexy feeling though. Where P!nk usually has a tone of “Fuck you, I’m P!nk!” Maroon 5 says something more along the lines of “I’m Maroon 5; I’ll bet you’ll fuck me.” With tracks like, “Lucky Strike,” “Daylight,” and “One More Night” they show that they can be the nice guy as well as the flirty sexy one as well.

My favorite tracks would probably be “The Man Who Never Lied” and “Lucky Strike.”

If you’re into Maroon 5, this album might be a detachment from their usual sound for you, but I think it’s fantastic. It’s a fun, whimsical, and sometimes sexy album. Worth the buy.

4/5 Stars

Head here to buy the album if you want: Maroon5.com

 

1 Hour and 26 Minutes: How a Grey’s Anatomy Episode Slayed Me

Sanctuary” is the 23rd episode of the sixth season of the American medical drama Grey’s Anatomy, and the 125th episode overall. Written by Shonda Rhimes, the creator of the show, and directed by Stephen Cragg, it premiered on ABC on May 20, 2010, as the first part of the two-hour season finale. “Death and All His Friends” is the twenty-fourth and final episode of the sixth season of the American television medical drama Grey’s Anatomy, and the show’s 126th episode overall. It premiered on May 20, 2010. Written byShonda Rhimes and directed by Rob Corn. (taken from WikiPedia)

I don’t know what finale I was watching that was on at the same time as this one. I think it’s a testament to the power of this two-part season finale that I don’t remember. I’ve never watched an episode of Grey’s before or since viewing this episode. I just watched it on a whim when flipping in between commercials.

I recently (right before writing this post) re-watched the episode on Netflix. When I refer to episode I mean both parts of the finale. I wanted to see if it was just as powerful now as when I had originally viewed it. Spoiler Alert: It was.

The basic synopsis of the episode is that a man has entered the hospital with a gun, looking for the Chief of Surgery (pictured above). He wants to kill him because his wife died here (they allude to it throughout the episode. From what I can gather she was on life support and they decided to take her off of it. This man is exacting revenge because of that). He is brushed off by a lot of doctors when he asks where to find the chief and eventually gets frustrated and kills one of the young doctors.

I don’t watch the show, so I didn’t really feel the impact of this character’s death until one of her friends discovers her later on and has a breakdown. The shooter also shoots one of the other doctors who walks in and keeps searching for Chief. Said doctor crawls to an elevator and is eventually found.

The shooter makes his way to one of the floors where two surgeons are conversing with Mandy Moore (she guest starred on this episode). The doctors hide and Mandy “plays dead.” The shooter finds one of the doctors and asks him if he is a surgeon. He says yes and gets shot. The other doctor is then discovered and the same question is asked. She lies and says that she’s just a nurse. He lets her live and she and Mandy Moore get to work trying to save the other doctor. He grabs the other doctor and says, “Don’t lie to me. If I’m going to die you tell me. Promise me you’ll tell me.” They continue to try and save him.

Meanwhile, the shooter begins walking upstairs and is stopped. He turns, kills a nurse, and keeps walking. This is when two other doctors discover the one that crawled into the elevator. They take him to a conference room and save him, though it’s a close one and one of the doctors is almost killed.

The Chief is eventually found by the shooter and is shot. His wife and another doctor see this happen as well as the shocked friend from earlier. His wife and the others get him to an operating room and eventually save him.

This brings me to the scene that absolutely makes the episode for me. The doctor from before and Mandy Moore drag the shot doctor to the elevator to get him to the O.R. only to discover…

That scene is one of the best written, acted, and directed scenes that I’ve ever watched in my life. I had waterfalls at that moment and I’ve never seen the show before. This is why I think the writers/directors/actors of this show are brilliant. In an hour and 26 minutes they made me care about these people to the point of tears. That’s incredibly rare for a show to be able to do that. I don’t know if I’ll watch more of the show, or just keep my fond memories of this one, but this episode is an achievement. This episode is a benchmark for others. I can name on one hand the amount of television finales that made me cry when I was invested in the show. This one achieved all that on one viewing.

Kudos to you Grey’s Anatomy. For a least a little over an hour, you reached perfection.

Technology and Cinematic Achievement

I’m going to be up front about this. I don’t enjoy watching Citizen Kane. I understand the innovations that it brought to Cinema, but I don’t think it’s a very good film. It’s decent sure, but the best movie ever made? I wouldn’t say so. 

Whenever people defend Citizen Kane to me, it’s often with the merit that it brought to the movies. “It changed the way people make movies!” With that argument, I can understand where they’re coming from, but if you look at the Top 10 lists of best movies ever (AFI’s is the most famous) it’s filled with movies from a long gone era. So long gone that movies like The Artist can win Best Picture based on nostalgia (whole other debate)!

When people list the best technology of all time, the items are usually fairly recent. iPhones, Xboxes, and other inventions lead the pack, because technology actively changes the way people do things, usually with each successive innovation. Films are incredibly closely tied with technology. This is why you see people like Cameron, Spielberg, Jackson, and Scorsese using technology to make their films go further and change cinema. 

We’re moving into a digital age of filmmaking, and I feel like these movies get a bad rap on “All Time” lists because they aren’t as hard to make or because they have more options to work with. If we’re going by innovations to the standard (which I think is a fine way to make these lists) then movies like Avatar, The Matrix, 300, O’ Brother Where Art Thou, and others should be topping AFI’s list of best movies of all time. 

If you ask someone what the best phone ever made was, they’ll probably tell you it was the iPhone. Nobody is going to tell you it was the 2 cans and string because of what it did for communication on the go. Ask people what the best television ever made was and they’ll probably mention some HDTV brand and a certain size. 

If we’re truly to judge the best of the best of Cinema by what they bring to the medium then our lists need a vast update. I wouldn’t take everything off, and Citizen Kane deserves to be in the top 10, but so does The Matrix and others. 

Film and Technology are like brother and sister. They’re so closely tied together that they innovate with each other and co-create experiences for people. In this regard, they should also have the same method of explaining why things are the best at what they are, and this method should be updated often to keep speed with the mediums.